× General Discussion

Women in Medicine 'harmful'?!?

More
15 years 2 months ago #10702 by Drey

Perhaps we won't have as many physicians who prefer research over the hugs of their children.

I think that this is a valid point, but I would address it by pointing out that we also have many more women becoming PhD type doctors. Many women are joining the fields of biomedical engineering, genetics, biological and biochemical research and medical device design. Although we as women physicians may lose a bit of the research edge, I beleive that the other type of women doctors, those that have professed a love of and interest in research, will more than balance it out.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 years 2 months ago #10703 by EKM
My doctor was such an awesome doctor who loved his family. It was so obvious, he would talk about them and referr to them at times, "When my youngest had that, we would..."
It made him seem much more on a patients level and show that he understood. That is why we stuck with him because he cared and had REAL experience. Med school is great, but can it really compare to parenthood? I haven't gone to medical school, but I am a Mom, and I think that being a parent is priceless experience..
Now adding Mom/Dad to MD/DO, that is a very cool combination. Most parents would be more sympathetic and understanding. And would think to themselves, "Would I do that with my child?"
Just my thoughts... :twocents: :wave: Erin

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 years 2 months ago #10704 by M-A
All I have to say is AAAARRGH :mad:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 years 2 months ago #10705 by Doctor Mom
I think she has a valid point, but an invalid solution. The valid point is that if most med students are women and most women choose to go into only a few specialties and/or to work part time, then there will be a shortage in other areas of medicine down the road. The answer is NOT to say "too many women are becoming doctors," but rather to ask, how can we attract women to the other specialties and to primary care?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 years 2 months ago #10706 by DrSAHM
These are her observations that she is making from what seems to be many years working in the industry so I guess she is entitled to her opinion.
Interestingly enough I'm finding over here (in Australia that is) that it is not just women that are making the lifestyle choices - a lot of our male peers are also aiming for lifestyle friendly specialties which has lessened the interest in surgery and other intensive time demanding areas in medicine. Of surgical discipines, people are heading towards eyes, or ENT (nicknamed early nights and tennis over here!) and avoiding other areas such as ob/gyn (apparently speaking english is one of the only prerequisites to getting on a training program now when it was once VERY competitive to get on). Of course, litigation has influenced that, not just lifestyle.
As a surgical trainee who has currently put training on hold. ( I'm enjoying time with my 1 year old ) I'm not finding any opposition to me doing surgery other than that there IS no other female around interested in doing job share (very very few on programme) and an inability to work part-time most probably because it has never been done before in this area. But, with more gals coming up thru the ranks this will hopefully soon change - i'm just hoping i'm not the one to make them change! :) For obvious reasons.
But, yes, I agree that as females we do tend to take lifestyle into account a lot more than male Docs appeared to even as recent as 10 yrs ago. Its not such a bad thing though - in fact it is WAY healthier for everybody concerned - us as Doctors and the patients we are here to care for.
;)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.196 seconds
Find us on Facebook!
Find us on Twitter!
Find us on Pinterest!