× Women Residents

i don't like gunners

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4 years 1 day ago #95223 by niash
So, we have this resident who spends one week on presentations with all sorts of bells and whistles. She also dumped her sig other because of her own "career" being more important. No attachments, work is all she does. While I feel it is important to read and keep uptodate, it is less important to spend time preparing slides, so I don't. Instead, I try to make good teaching points during mine. I certainly feel that ppl with no sense of balance in their lives like this one make others look bad. Luckily, she is pretty much the only one in the residency who does this...

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3 years 11 months ago #95244 by lolaMD
I think you hit the nail on the head... work is likely all she has. I suspect there may be a little overcompensation going on in this situation because of that. You are likely not alone in thinking the whole situation is a bit overdone. Like you said, she seems to be more of the exception than the rule in your program. I have found that that kind of dynamic in a laid back residency environment (at least is true in mine) elicits more eye rolls than admiration

Of the physicians whom I have worked with over the years, particularly attendings, the ones I respect the most as mentors and models are those who find balance. They somehow find time to read up on literature between bedtime stories and sports games and patient care. They are efficient and effective at completing their work and value educational quality of presentations over glitz and glam. In the rocky moments that frequently come with medicine, these are the physicians whom often can overcome the storms with ease and grace. They have other things to fall back on, and do not simply crumble because the one thing they have falls apart. If all you have is medicine, when that goes poorly, your entire life goes poorly. I am a strong proponent of surrounding yourself with multiple things that make you happy... whether it be family, friends, pets, hobbies, church, community service... something that can keep you stable and sane when the world goes to hell and allow you to provide consistent quality care for your patients.

Like you said, you recognize that reading and expanding your education is important.
Presentation bells and whistles are often time-intensive fluff.

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3 years 3 weeks ago #96048 by tootincommon
I don't really understand why you care how much time she spends on her presentations or what's going on in her personal life. Do you think maybe your presentations actually could use a bit more work?

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2 years 2 months ago #96590 by CardioCat
I don't like gunners either, if you mean those who tend to throw others under the bus to make themselves "shine".
Teamwork and sharing of knowledge and skills is the most beneficial to all patients, present and future.
Unfortunately, not every resident/med student/fellow is mature enough to see that.
Like other posters above said, she may be throwing herself into her work to distract from personal issues.
Don't envy her or begrudge her presentations, instead, try to understand and support her.
When my father in law died of lung cancer during intern year, and another intern's mother passed from cancer, we both threw ourselves into work. It was such a relief to come in for a long day at the hospital because it completely occupied our minds and we didn't have time to think about our grief.
We never asked each other about our families or how we were "holding up", but we understood each other. Just let her do her thing, perhaps it will pass. Focus on your work and studies. :)

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